What is true for people is also true for cars: communication works best with a common language and a good connection. To enable connected and automated driving in the future, vehicles must be able to easily communicate with one another as well as with their surroundings. There is currently no globally standardized technical basis for this exchange of data, which is known as vehicle-to-everything communication, or V2X.

Instead, vehicles will in future communicate using the wide variety of different standards implemented by countries and vehicle manufacturers around the world.

Bosch has combined connectivity units and telematics units, which – individually – are only capable of a single transmission technology, to create an all-in-one central control unit for V2X data communication. Cars can then use the Wi-Fi networks available in cities, while elsewhere they can communicate using, for instance, cellular networks. The complex task of managing these diverse communication options is handled by a software solution from  Veniam. It continuously searches for the best transmission technology that suits the particular requirements and switches automatically between the available alternatives. The software therefore maintains continuous and seamless vehicle connectivity, ensuring cars can, for example, reliably alert one another to accidents and passengers can enjoy uninterrupted music streaming.

The software from Veniam is the connection enhancer for the connectivity unit from Bosch. As well as keeping an eye on which V2X communication technologies are currently available for use, the software also closely monitors the costs and data transmission latency of each alternative connection option, since not every technology is suitable in every situation. For example, when it comes to alerting a driver to another vehicle that is about to pull out in front of them from a side street, every millisecond counts. This kind of critical information must be communicated in real time using highly reliable technology that is always ready for use – even if that means the resulting data transmission costs are greater. Software updates from the cloud or a navigation system map update, on the other hand, can be put on hold in that sort of situation until a low-cost stationary Wi-Fi network becomes available. Large volumes of data can be transmitted via Wi-Fi in a short space of time, though a downside is that public or home Wi-Fi hotspots are not always available.