Nagoya University and Cadence to develop AUTOSAR based applications

Collaboration enables embedded software engineers to accelerate development of automotive applications on AUTOSAR OS

Cadence announced it has collaborated with the Embedded Real-Time System Laboratory of Nagoya University to port the AUTOSAR-compliant TOPPERS ATK2-SC1 (Toyohashi OPen Platform for Embedded Real-time Systems Automotive Kernel version-2 Scalability Class 1) to Cadence Tensilica processors and DSPs. Nagoya University and Cadence jointly ported the ATK2-SC1 to the Tensilica processor platform, validating that it functions correctly and operates at competitive performance levels. With this port, developers working on advanced driver assistance system (ADAS), human machine interface (HMI), autonomous driving system and other automotive applications requiring the high computational capabilities of Tensilica processors can start early development of automotive applications on the TOPPERS automotive kernel.

Automotive electronic systems are increasing exponentially in complexity, making it increasingly challenging for electronic control units (ECUs) to perform their specific control functions while also connecting to the various automotive networks reliably. The AUTOSAR architecture organizes the building blocks that compose the ECU software stack, allowing multiple suppliers and OEMs to collaborate on the development of critical system components. Reuse of well-defined software components allows ECUs to be developed quickly and efficiently, and systems are becoming more heterogeneous in their deployment of processors and DSPs.

The broadly adopted and production-proven TOPPERS ATK2-SC1 real-time operating system (RTOS) automotive kernel, which manages the detailed timing of software tasks in automotive system control applications, is one of the most critical of these software building blocks. Now that Nagoya University and Cadence have ported the ATK2-SC1 to the Tensilica processor family, ECU developers can take advantage of the Tensilica DSP architectures to optimize their processors for their specific application without changing the RTOS automotive kernel. This enables them to start early development of automotive applications on the AUTOSAR OS while maintaining the high quality and dependability required for safety-critical automotive systems.

Source: Cadence